Institute of Evolution

The Institute of Evolution (IoE) 

Established in the University of Haifa at 1977 by prof. Eviatar Nevo, includes 12 faculty members (members of the Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology) and more than 20 affiliated scientists with PhD degrees.

The Institute of Evolution (IOE) at the University of Haifa is unique in its broad and interdisciplinary research with particular expertise in population and evolutionary genetics, developmental evolution, behavioral evolution, bioinformatics and ecology. The IOE is situated on Mount Carmel at the heart of the Carmel national park, next to one of most beautiful cities around the Mediterranean, we are in prefect location to study biodiversity and evolution.  We are abundant with in house and outdoor facilities providing for modern, cutting edge science. Together with the Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology  based in our campus, we are a center of excellence in the field of ecology and evolution in the north of Israel.

Institute News



Congratulations to Prof. Eran Tauber for winning an EU Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action for doctoral education and postdoctoral training for research of biological clocks in Insects!


Congratulations to Prof. Moshe Inbar for publishing his brand new book: Gall-inducing aphids on Pistacia species in Israel 



בנק הגנים .12023_1_ENGsubs (1).mp4

Catсhing Blind Mole Rats by Dr. Imad Shams in the Upper Galilee

Imad Video.mp4

Credit: Dr. Grace Smarsh

Scientific Seminars 

The presented lectures deal mainly with the hot topics in evolutionary biology, molecular genetics, genomics, and ecology. The seminars are delivered by expert lecturers and distinguished visitors in a relaxed environment

At this point, the seminars will be held on Mondays at 12:00 pm 

      Next seminar:


  20.05.2024, Seminar Room 223, Multi-purpose building

         (will be held at 11:15 am) 

      

        Uri Roll, 

    Mitrani Department of Desert Ecology, 

   Ben-Gurion University of the Negev



 Just Google it – what can large online repositories tell us about  human-nature relationships and basic ecological patterns